Inland Empire universities invest in entrepreneurship programs – Redlands Daily Facts

Inland Empire colleges and universities are investing in the region through new entrepreneurship programs.

The expected dividend? A considerably improved economy.

In recent years, programs designed to promote entrepreneurship and foster innovation have been established or expanded at Cal Poly Pomona, Cal State San Bernardino, UC Riverside, and University of La Verne. The goal is to train students who will start new businesses and perhaps bring whole new industries to the area. Additionally, administrators hope the programs will attract businesses attracted to the resources offered by universities, including highly skilled and highly skilled workers.

Even without specialized programs in entrepreneurship or innovation, a large college or university can inject tens to hundreds of millions of dollars into the regional economy. But despite this long-established link between the presence of a four-year university and improving economic conditions in a region, there is less evidence that entrepreneurship and innovation programs will have a similar effect.

  • Expressions of gastrointestinal organoid markers from human stem cells are seen at the UC Riverside Life Sciences incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • A barcode accentuates the windows of UC Riverside’s life sciences incubator as Andrew Hardin, CEO of Riverside Studio, holds a meeting on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press- Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Neyroblast Gx grows bacteria in an incubator shaker at UC Riverside’s Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Alexander Michkov, Scientific Manager of Neyroblast Gx, shuts down an incubator shaker designed to grow bacteria at UC Riverside’s Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Neyroblast Gx CEO Aynun Begum pauses before looking at the expressions of gastrointestinal organoid markers in human stem cells at UC Riverside’s Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Kevin Campbell, a research scientist from Karamedica, combines a biopolymer and DNA to create nanoparticles at the UC Riverside Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press- Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Nanoparticles are examined by a research scientist from Karamedica at the UC Riverside Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Neyroblast Gx CEO Aynun Begum observes the expressions of gastrointestinal organoid markers from human stem cells at UC Riverside’s Life Sciences Incubator on Friday, September 3, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Photos of entrepreneurs and sayings like “Think Like a Homeowner” adorn the Cal State San Bernardino Entrepreneurship and Innovation Course on Thursday, September 2, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Steve Abbott, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, is leading an entrepreneurship course at Cal State San Bernardino on Thursday, September 2, 2021. He discusses the entrepreneur’s mindset when it comes to problem solving. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Steve Abbott, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, gives a talk at Cal State San Bernardino on Thursday, September 2, 2021. He discusses the history of entrepreneurship around the world. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • The entrepreneurship and innovation class is packed at Cal State San Bernardino on Thursday, September 2, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Nazario Jimenez gives a report on the history of paper in Asia in his entrepreneurship and innovation class at Cal State San Bernardino on Thursday, September 2, 2021. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

  • Entrepreneurship and innovation programs are offered at California State San Bernardino on Thursday, September 2, 2021. Inspirational words and images from successful local entrepreneurs adorn the walls. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise / SCNG)

“It is not so easy to measure the economic impact of these innovation centers because they take a long time to develop,” said Robert Kleinhenz, senior researcher at the Inland Empire Economic Partnership and founder of Kleinhenz Economics.

But donors have high hopes.

“By having programs and infrastructure that help our students, faculty, and the community to build businesses, you activate this economy,” said Rosibel Ochoa, who leads innovation and entrepreneurship efforts at the Office of Technology Partnerships. of the UCR.

Ochoa previously ran an entrepreneurship program at UC San Diego. She credits the university’s presence for helping to change San Diego from a city focused on tourism and the military to a city of “the knowledge economy.” Over 200 businesses have started in the area, clustered around the university, while Ochoa was at UC San Diego.

“We have great universities in the Inland Empire,” Ochoa said. “UCR is a $ 200 million research university that in any other state would be considered one of the largest. “

A January 2021 impact study released by the University of California reports that the UC system as a whole means 25,577 additional jobs in the Inland Empire and $ 3.1 billion in spending in the region. More than 20,000 jobs and $ 2.3 billion are owed to the UCR alone, according to Ochoa.

It highlights the vibrant business communities that surround MIT and Silicon Valley.

“All of these areas have developed because of their proximity to universities,” Ochoa said. “For me, the most important thing is to create and educate the talent that we need, and to keep it here.”

To do so, last August, Cal State San Bernardino announced that it was transforming the entrepreneurship program offered by its business school into a full-fledged entrepreneurship school. The school will offer eight academic programs in entrepreneurship, including a graduate degree dedicated to entrepreneurship and innovation.

In March, the University of La Verne announced the Randall Lewis Center for Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Social Impact in Ontario. The center will offer entrepreneurial training to small groups of students and academic and practical approaches to job creation and long-term career support, according to the university. The center will make a special effort to work with underserved communities in the Inland Empire.

And in June, Congress approved a million dollar grant to Cal Poly Pomona to develop an entrepreneurial and social hub for start-ups in the Inland Empire. The Bronco STEA2M Innovation Hub will provide resources, support and training opportunities to help entrepreneurs and small businesses and family businesses achieve their goals. Cal Poly plans to locate the hub in downtown Pomona.

Even the most successful of these projects is unlikely to turn the Inland Empire into another Silicon Valley, with many tech companies in multiple fields, Kleinhenz warns.

But, he notes, many parts of the country have developed more specialized counterparts, focused on biotechnology or other more specialized fields. But the next wave of business leaders seems to be here.

According to Ochoa, over the past five years, more than 6,500 patents have been awarded to inventors in the Inland Empire, just under the 6,800 awarded to those in Orange County.

“One of the things that’s exciting about the Inland Empire is not only that it’s growing up extremely fast, but it’s also very young,” Ochoa said.

Since 2016, UCR has worked with more than 600 start-ups, 60% of which come from outside the university community. Over the past three years, companies have raised more than $ 22 million in venture capital, including $ 15.4 million in 2020-21.

“Five years ago,” Ochoa said. “But now you’re showing them the data… That’s not the case anymore.”

This fall, UC Riverside will look to bring together more entrepreneurs from the Inland Empire with mentors and funding at the Riverside Angel Summit 2021, which runs from September through November. Beyond that, university officials hope to build the OASIS cleantech park in the coming years to serve as a research park, university extension, and start-up incubator and accelerator. Administrators hope to open the doors to the first phase in 2025.

Source link

About Barbara Johnson

Check Also

Universities must comply with health guidelines in the event of reopening: Ministry of Health

Each unit responsible for making arrangements for the membership programStudents between the ages of 20 …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *